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on to help a student at howard and quote came out for students to go to mississippi because of the work that was going on there. i had seen some -- i had attended a deposition in washington and folk from mississippi and things they had suffered. this elderly man, hartman, talked about what happened on the bus. i was a student. all of the students were coming from all over the country. i was the black student and the student leadership at howard said we have to get there and be there with others. so i went to mississippi that summer of 1964 and i lived with a family. ms.johnson, her daughter was a teenager, june johnson and had been beaten in wynonna, mississippi. june was a strong girl. the family was strong there were about 12 children in the family. they took in three of us. two white girls and myself. host: ruth thanks for the call and thank you for sharing your story from 50 years ago. owen ullmann, we talked about your own participation. walk us through how you arrived here and why you came? guest: my parent has raised me and i'm proud of their values of stressing the importance
of mississippi arrived in tokyo on august 28th to commemorate the historic day. the message he brought is let freedom ring. >> he played a spiritual song he has been listening to since the childhood. they helped them during the struggles. >> in the words of doctor martin luther king,jr. equality for everyone. freedom. you remind me that i have to be conscious of the inequality that does exist in the world. i don't know how much longer it's going to take with another 50 years or what. we have to keep the march going. >> u.s. secretary of defense chuck hagel joined the minster defense leaders in the southeast asian nations. it contains a number of security challenges including disputes over the south china sea. the agenda was overtaken by events in the mideast and talk of possible u.s. military action against syria. the obama administration identified the asia pacific region as an area of importance for the united states. hagel attended the asean defense minster's meeting on wednesday. he will join a wider discussion on thursday when minsters from china, japan and other countries join their cou
rather have a brand new state of the art pipeline traveling down the margin mississippi and on the trunk to be cut tanker cars and trucks. >> host: there was a story that was reported by the newspaper saying that the decision would likely be until the inspector general looked at the investigation of the conflict of interest complete and the inspector general looked at the complete of the environmental research mismanagement that prepares the environmental impact statement on the keystone xl on the central conflict. >> guest: it's not a new story. that came out and was thoroughly investigated. my understanding is that there were no conflicts found. what you are starting to see frankly is the recycling of a lot of defense. keep in mind, that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite the cross border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this environment environmental impact we could have built the empire state building five times buy now. we have completed world war ii in less time. so again as an institutional list a
a burn in mississippi. people are not being hung in mississippi any more. there's racism there, no doubt. there's racism in boston. when you went through those periods, i went through them in boston, i was amazed how much the white community were really outraged in boston. but let's keep in mind the tenor of the times you're born in. these kids today are not born at a time when there's racial tension. >> still, the leader of the senate. >> i understand that. >> president obama noted in his remarks when he made in the white house press briefing room at the end of the trayvon martin trial, or the george zimmerman trial, about the killing of trayvon martin, he said his daughters, sasha and malia don't talk this way. we learn from previous experiences. what i think is concerning is how exacerbated the administration makes these. partly because we pay attention to what they say, we're looking for any signal, we want the president to bring us together and it actually hasn't happened. maybe that's the fault of those who would oppose him on his policies. somehow i don't -- i actually can't get m
general. i'm from mississippi and my father worked heavily to dissect regate schools in mississippi. my mother didn't have a black high school. my father had to build it. now we have education and equality. but is there a level playing field today? >> as the reverend jesse jackson pointed out today, he said that african americans are less equal -- >> we have the first black president. but unemployment in the black community is on the increase. >> 2.6% black unemployment. versus 6.6% for whites. >> first of all, it's not just a black problem and those indices are for the black community but there are disparities in other communities, also. having said that, i think all of us have to get engaged. it's not just a government problem. one of the key points that president obama mentioned today. everybody has to get involved. when children are born out of wedlock that's not the government. some individuals need to hear what's happening at their churches. men and women need to take responsibility. in all communities. >> he's right, the reverend is right from the standpoint government is suppose
teenager on vacation in mississippi. is it is a new day, but the day isn't over. the struggle for the civil rights for civil rights, social justice, and economic opportunity to man our engagement and our voice. to realize fully our dream we must raise our voices and take action. we must lift our voices to challenge government and our community and neighbors to be better. we must lift our voices for wages that enable families to take care of themselves, for a health care system that erases disparities, for communities and homes without violence, for clean air and water to protect our environment for future generations, and for a just justice system. we must lift our voice for the value of our boat and have our votes counted without interference. as we stand here today, dr. king would know, and john lewis certainly knows, that today is not just a commemoration or celebration. it is a call to action for the work remains undone in the communities that remain unchanged. our foremothers and forefathers 50 years ago closed the books on the last century. well, when the book closes on the 21st centu
, in the delta of mississippi. >> and there was a line about marching through the south like sherman which had to be exercised before you delivered, isn't that right? >> it is true that i did have a line in the speech that said in effect if we do not see meaningful progress here today, the day will come, when we will not confine our marching in washington. but we may be forced to march through the south the way sherman did nonviolently. the archbishop of washington -- if i did not delete that part of the speech. and we had some discussion the evening before the march. and later someone came to me and said how is your speech and i said, we have to make some changes you have to delete something. and i remember having a discussion with mr. wilkins and i said roy, this is my speech. and i'm speaking for the young people. speaking people fresh from jails. and he sort of dropped it. and randolph and martin luther king, jr. came to me. and we met right on the side of mr. lincoln. the music was already playing. someone had a portable;÷ñ÷ typewriter. and dr. king said to me, john that doesn't sound
senator from mississippi joins us. we will see you tomorrow night. night. good night from new york. ♪ ...and ev stop itself if it has to. the technology may be hard to imagine... but why you wod want it isot. ♪ the 2014 e-clas it doesn't just see the fure, it is the future. neil: and here you were worried about them collecting your phone records. tens of the nsa has been collecting more than that. forget about every color we make. try every e-mail we right, every chat room in which we have a chance. what we type, where we browsed, how long we have been browsing, everything we point and click catalog to by an agency his abuses are pathetic and sick. here is what is even more alarming. they're still doing it. they are doing more of it. slocum, everybody. i'm neil cavuto, and it is enough to make even james bond blush.
with a dollop of daisy. ♪ do a dollop of daisy >>> take a look at the scene in gulfport, mississippi. a storm hit during a church service. and so much rain fell so fast, that worshipers became stranded inside of their church. about six inches of rain fell in about two hours. the only time the flooding there was worse was during hurricane katrina. >> and wearing the sunday best. >>> all right. let's take a look at the road conditions. it will be wet along the gulf coast and in the southeast again today. flooding is possible there once again. and rain also could make things difficult for parts of the southwest and the rockies. >> staying in the southwest. if you're flying, it won't be any surprise there will be some delays there. also in the southeast, in atlanta, charlotte and new orleans. >>> new details this morning of a fiery incident on a los angeles freeway that involved actor dick van dyke. >> home video shows the 87-year-old actor's late model jaguar charred after it somehow caught fire and then exploded. abc's gio benitez has the story. >> "the dick van dyke show." >> reporter: he's th
percent. only mississippi had a decline from 9 percent down to 8.5 percent. unemployment fell in 8 states and was unchanged in 14 states. in seattle considering raising their minimum wage to $15 an hour. the state has the heist minimum rate at $9.19 an hour. the mayoral candidates say they will consider this. it may make it more difficult for major rekalers to operate there. wal-mart refused to accept a decision to raise minimum wage to 12.50 an hour. according to a british survey the average officer suffered death raids twice a day computer crashes and rude clients and computer failure. >> the survey found 51 percent of friends experience serial work with aaroning not having a proper time for lunch. they get stressed out over technology malfunctions not surprisingly 42 percent of workers are most wound up and i am patie impatient on a monday. good news, guys, today is tuesday. >>> are you guilty of your own desk rage? tweet us at fox frien foxfriendsfirst@foxnews.com and let us know. >>> it is 10 minutes after the top of the hour. coming up they are supposed to catch you or me if you bre
mississippi. that is not good news for >>> over the weekend. manuel bojorquez is in gulf port, mississippi. manuel good morning to you. >> . >> reporter: good morning to our viewers out west. the threat remains to the florida panhandle. with the ground saturated, residents are keeping a watchful eye on the gulf. they are concerned about what a tropical storm or hurricane this season could mean. like much of the southeast, gulf port has been pounded by record rainfall, getting nearly 5 inches in 2 hours at one point. that caught people off guard. twenty-two streets here were flooded. downtown businesses are cleaning up from as much as 18 inches of water now, of course, gulf port and the gulf coast are no strangers to heavy rainfall; but residents here say the recent storms flooded parts of the city that didn't flood during hurricane katrina back in 2005. charlie and gale? . >> manuel thanks. >> if police officers arrest you, do they have the right to search your smartphone. the obama administration believes the answer is yes. however two federal courts disagree. now the white house wants t
that these were phoneo scandals like the mississippi river they keep rolling and keeps getting bigger. i think the republicans are doing well. i think they are very methodical and are not hysterical. they are pursuing it and it will take time but they are pulling on it a thread at a time. >> what about that? if it starts expanding beyond the irs that starts to become more of a problem for the administration. >> they are not supposed to share information but the threat would be that they are sharing information for political purposes to undermine conservatives. in this situation that is not clear. they shared it with the enforcement division of the federal elections commission. so there could be a legitimate reason to see if somebody has tax exempt status to see what they are requesting and then requesting similar status from irs. we don't know. but the idea is and i think that there was testimony from lerner that there had been no sharing of data whatsoever. so now we have an exception to the rule apparently and of course that compounds all the suspicious about lerner and the fact that she has
on the southern mississippi valley. the northeast, is the beautiful spot. temperatures staying below normal. more rain in the forecast by the end of the week. >> we need you to settle something for us. >> gustnado's are real? they don't have to involve sharks? >> always sharks. >>> scary moments for fire crews in boise, idaho running away from a house on fire. look at this just before the collapse. 55 firefighters on the scene battling a three-alarm blaze. they realized something was wrong. radioed for colleagues to get back. they did. >> oh, my goodness. look at that collapse. terrible. >> minor injuries. >> before we move on, it's great to have you back. >> you miss me hitting you, right? beating on you. >> fully recovered. >> i love being back. i showed pictures on twitter. i had a fabulous surprise this morning. it's amazing. >> don't go away, ever again. >> so sweet. you have a big heart. >> 11 minutes past the hour. is student viciously attacked on a bus. the driver, watching the brawl from the front of the bus. should he have stopped the fight. you are going to hear why he didn't, coming u
. this is during a routine dive in mississippi. this is a 66-year-old who was doing a tandem dive. the student is in critical condition with broken bones and a head injury. the owner said the instructor cut away his main parachute and used backup but it's not clear what went wrong. the faa is investigating this along with local authorities. >>> a man who saw a car mow down 13 pedestrians, this is on l.a.'s venice beach. the driver was looking for blood. >> reporter: you see the suspect's car plowing in and swerving around barriers. >> the just drove and took that barrier down and bodies were scattering and flying in the air and people were screaming and it was absolute mayhem. >> reporter: a second camera angle shows the driver getting out casing the boardwalk. ghets back in and floors it. >> he has to have pressed foot to the gas because tires started screeching. he was looking for blood. that guy's intention was to kill people. >> reporter: an italian tourist on her honeymoon was killed and 11 others injured in a scene a quarter mile long. the suspect is nathan campbell of los angeles. just
are graduates from syracuse which are fifth and shepherd smith went to you have the of mississippi which was 14th and hemmer went to university of ohio which was 16th. do you know what this means? >> no. >> todd kelly is stocking all of them. >> true. that is an interesting and completely pointless list. >> greg, your senior year was a blur, right? >> my four years was a blur. >> what senior year? >> i actually cleaned up. my first two years were nothing but drinking and bad grades. and then i realized if i wanted a job i had to become -- i cleaned it up. boy that was a boring story. i expected something funny to come out of my mouth and instead it was just a little spit. coming up, ralph maccio is dead -- set against making a karate 4. he probably can't lift his leg past this point. i kid. what is this? a 15-ton ball of fat? i think i have died and gone to 15 ton ball of fat heaven. >>> was it a proper greeting for a player's cheating? on monday alex rodriguez made his season debut shortly after mlb suspended him for using performance enhancing drugs. and he wasn't met with cheers as i had pre
in the mississippi river. the missouri supreme court will now decide his fate. walmart has agreed to approve -- improve safety conditions as part of a settlement with federal health and safety regulators. federal inspectors have uncovered what they termed repeat and serious violations at a store in rochester, new york. under the deal, walmart will improve procedures relating to trash compactors and the handling of chemicals and hire an outside monitor to ensure compliance at store locations in 28 states. walmart will also pay $190,000, tiny fraction of its profits which amounted to 17 billion dollars last year. in a statement, the worker group our walmart, which has lisa only -- which has recently led a number of historic strikes, said last month workers at a california warehouse that moose products for walmart launched a two-day strike to protest alleged retaliation after reporting safety issues that included blocked emergency exits, nonfunctioning forklift brakes and a lack of sufficient ventilation, and water under intense heat. japan's prime minister has ordered government action to help
government, grown at the university of mississippi and then sent out to dispensaries every month. this isn't that hard. all we have to do is have the president of the united states change it from schedule one to schedule two. bring it under the controls that we already have and therefore pharmacies could dispense it. they already have saves. we have a system in place and if our government has been testing it, growing it and selling it for 37 years, how long is it going to take them to figure it out? >> there's a hypocrisy here, piers. it's amazing. that's an example of the hypocrisy. the united states government also owns a patent on marijuana as a medical application. montel has it here. we have a patent through our department of health and human services on marijuana as a therapeutic and we scheduled it as a scheduled one saying it has no medical application. >> we are going to go to the break but let me come back with the director of adolescent substance abuse program and the chair of the academic of american pediatrics and she has a different view and i'm sure it will be a forth right
. >> it depends in the context of the time in which you were raised. i was raised in the '60 sglsh mississippi. >> not only that a student of my history. i said this many times, it's not a part of who i am to use that word. i understand why other people do. it's impossible for me to do it because i know the history, and i know that for so many of my relatives whom i don't know, who i don't know by name, people who i'm connected to, ancestors, that was the last word they heard as they were being strung up by a tree. that was the last sense of degradation that they experienced as, you know, some harm was caused to them. i just -- it's just not a part of the fabric of who i am. so out of respect to those who have come before and the price that they paid to rid themselves of being relegated to that word, i just don't use it. >> well, we had a fascinating conversation. we'll have more on my interview tomorrow on "360." it opens tomorrow. >>> the custody battle over veronica may be near a breaking pointment the adopted parents are in oklahoma tonight trying to bring her home. the lawyers from both s
the gulf coast and florida panhandle all the way into south carolina. gulfport, mississippi, the floodwaters receding there but with more rain in the forecast they may rise yet again. tracking it all for us is chad myers. ha is the latest, chad? >> anderson, when you have a stationary front, like a stationary bike, things don't move. you can pedal that bike all you want, it is not going anywhere. these storms aren't going anywhere. so what is raining now was raining an hour ago and what was raining this weekend is pretty much still raining at this point. look at these five-day rainfall totals. this is from friday afternoon to now. 12.5 inches in florida thachlt is a beach. not much of a beach vacation. panama city, popular place, ten inches of rainfall over the weekend. everywhere that you see red, that's six inches. at purple higher than that, and the ten-inch bulls eyes, macon, georgia, has 24 more inches on ground than they should have. so when it rains, it floods. there's no place for the water to soak in. it's been like that for days and days and days and the rain conti
're not breaking the law. the kids wish network has faced fines before in utah and mississippi. the fines, all those fines added up to a little more than $6,000. >> unbelievable. how that woman sleeps at night and she's there shaking your hand and acting like everything is proper. this kid's wish network, they have been around a long, long time. >> since 1997, and listen to this, this is interesting. it began with a different name. the fulfill a wish foundation, which sounds a lot like make a wish, right, anderson? >> yeah. >> the folks at make a wish actually sued forcing fulfill a wish to change the name. that's how they got to the kids wish network. we found that as quite common, too. the less than forthcoming charities they want names that sound very much like respected charities. >> the bottom line, there are good charities out there. people can go to charity navigator to find out actual ratings of charities. >> you really should. the last thing you should do is have the phone ring and find a telemarketer on the other end asking you for money and telling you all the great things they're g
rights movement. on june 12th mississippi's naacp field secretary medgar evers was murdered outside his home. dr. king delivered his famous i have a dream speech and on july 2nd, 1964, about the johnson signed the civil rights act of 1964, the most sweeping civil rights legislation since reconstruction. both dr. king and his father led the congregation at ebeneezer baptist church. the current pastor of that church reverend dr. rafael joins me. >> good to be with you tony. thanks so much. >> give us your reflections of this day and move on from there. >> it's been an exciting day and a thrilling week, as we gathered on the mall remembering that great day 50 years ago, i'm a part of the post-civil rights generation, born a decade after dr. king's death. but for americans across the nation dr. king's words that day with his soaring oratory, our right to remember it but our challenge today is to make sure that while we engage in commemoration we move from commemoration to recommitment that we ensure that we do not cash in the dream for sentimental memories, dr. king came to the capital with
to be a person that is helping the cause and not coming against it. >> you grew up in mississippi? >> i did. kelly, i am two generations short from maids and farmers. it's because of my father, the late reverend james thomas mcclowen, that my mother got to go to high school. he built the first black high school in mississippi, my town. we have a long way to go. my father worked heavily to help integrate schools in mississippi. but today we don't have a level playing field when it comes to education. today the new plantation is the prison system. we have more black males in the prison system. so with the hard work that my father did and by the way, he was assistant warden also in the prison where before my father got there, there were chain gangs. my father really believed that you could rehabilitate the criminal. so we have a long way to go with the inner city, with people now on welfare, more so than ever before. so we have equal opportunity. do we have equal access? >> jack gains, thank you. joe freeman, good friends of mine. thank you both. juan williams, always good to have you. angela,
in meridian, mississippi in an integrated school. and went to school at university of alabama at a very integrated campus and at a campus that in the 1980s was actually handling racial issues a lot better than a lot of campuses across the northeast. but martin luther king not only did for america but what he did for his home region of the south, a region that had been scarred by racism and racial tensions for years. to see how quickly things -- he gave this speech the year i was born in a segregated south and segregated america. by the time i started first grade in meridian mississippi it w was integrated. that is nothing short of extraordinary and that is a legacy that we put first at the feet of martin luther king and also all the civil rights workers and protesters and leaders who gave their all to make sure that white children like myself and black children who were my friends, who i played football with in first grade and baseball with in first grade, would go to school together. that was the normal. that was normal for me. let me -- al, let me go to you quickly here. it is incredi
can't get fresh salmon. >> mississippi number two, alabama number three. >> bad accents. >> we're the craziest state. >> california tops the list. >> craziest state and you adopt even mention florida? come on. that doesn't make sense at all. >> i've lived in florida and florida has all the of the weirdest news stories. don't certain websites have pages just devoted to florida weird news. >> u.s. news, foreign news, sports, florida. >> colorado also has a lot of weird news. >> fun to talk about. everyone has their own opinion. >>> a sad scene, hundreds of dolphins mysteriously dying along the east coast. why is this happening and what does it have to do with humans? >> and is today the day the -- >> boy band. >> i shouldn't read this. what do i know. it's 'n sync, are they getting together? brand-new evidence your favorite boy band and needless to say mine is making a comeback. >> nervous, tucker is reading this one. he does have all their albums. we're new to town.ells. welcome to monroe. so you can move more effortlessly... we want to open a new account: checking and savings.
, mississippi, at "the advocate," a historically african-american newspaper. but "the advocate" had a history of being firebombed, a fact that worried his mother, so that did not last long. mr. jealous was also the executive director of the national newspapers publishers association, which represents african american focused, owned, and operated newspapers. what may have been his biggest advocacy challenge is how he courted his wife and the struggle to keep her and win her over with little money and a new job in d.c. he succeeded, however, and is married to lia, and the couple have two young children. but at the core of what mr. jealous is speaking about today, yesterday marked the 50th anniversary of the 1963 march on washington. five decades since martin luther king spoke, the nation has its first black president, but still has serious issues for the african-american people, including record incarceration, double digit unemployment, ballot box suppression, and youth violence. the killing of trayvon martin brought back racial concerns to the front pages. questions remain if the naacp, like m
, mississippi, south carolina, texas and virginia -- decided to push forward with voter suppression efforts that could disenfranchise hundreds of thousands of americans. weeks later, other states have followed suit, including north carolina whose legislature just passed the nation's most restrictive voting law in the country. even as the justice department has taken action to combat suppression, attorney general eric holder has acknowledged that it is "no substitute for legislation that will fill the void left by the supreme court's decision." last week, president obama met with civil rights leaders to reassure them that his administration would vigorously fight to preserve voting rights. while voting rights of millions hangs in the balance, the president sounded a cautious note of optimism saying the voting rights act is not dead, it is not even critical, it is just wounded. joining us now, president of the national urban league, mark morial. >> thanks for having me. >> in this momentous almost anniversary. >> we're seeing a concerted effort that really began before the 2012 election to re
in mississippi and make you jump through hoops. the shwag the federal government is growing isn't that good anyway and doesn't let you study a lot of different strains. it could be so simple and easy to do actual scientific research on marijuana but the government stands in the way. >> where is the obama administration on this part of the question? where has the obama administration been on the scientific question here? >> scientifically they've been great. they've said, look, we're not going to get in the way of the states. this is what they've said. the states that have passed medical marijuana laws. in practice, the d.e.a. has been kicking in doors in california, washingt washington, montana, colorado. wherever there's a medical marijuana law, there are u.s. attorneys there spending a lot of time and resources to try to tackle what they see as a problem. it takes six to nine months, a former administration official told me, to run one of these investigations on a pot shop. these pot shops are advertising in the yellowbook and in the alt weeklies and have store fronts with pot leaves on t
rate. in fact, only five states have a higher one. nevada, illinois, mississippi, rhode island and north carolina. pretty stunning. by the way, christie has kept a football field's worth of distance between himself and controversial gop senate nominee. but finally decide to endorse him at an event on tuesday. the first and last time chris christie probably campaigning with him. washington chief correspondent dan balls. and political eder to for the degreo.com harry bacon jr. and liz showny from the associated press. mr. balls, we have dined out on candidates starting presidential campaigns early for decades. in some ways, we love it as political junkies. what's surprising is when front-runners who don't need to do it dip in too early. hillary clinton, dipping too fast? >> i'm not sure. i think you're right. part of this is driven by us. >> doesn't take much to feed -- >> our april tied petite to get next campaign grows so that's part of it. the other is could she avoid it anyway? she's being drawn into the conversation in a sense whether she contributes to it or not. the fact t
like a coin flip. stories about green tech automatic, fledgling car company he moved to mississippi and hasn't gotten off to a booming start. all that said, a quinnipiac poll last week had mcauliffe up among likely voters. no one on either side believes mcauliffe is up by quite that much but everyone believes he is ahead and it's clear cuccinelli's campaign is worried. in fact, so worried, they're going after mcdonnell. cuccinelli has run a good campaign but it's the issue that he can't control the gop has concluded is a serious liability. governor mcdonnell. it was just months ago they fought over who would be more like mcdonnell as a governor. in what can only be described as a stunning development, cuccinelli went negative on mcdonnell in a tv ad called facts. >> the truth, there's only one candidate under investigation, terry mcauliffe. the press calls the attacks false. a democratic commonwealth attorney cleared kucuccinelli o any wrongdoing. cuccinelli launched the investigation into bob mcdonnell and called for reform. those are the facts. >> let's bring in the gaggle. nbc po
pitbulls were rescued this weekend in a massive raid that stretched across texas, mississippi, alabama and georgia. david mattingly is "out front" on this story. hi, david. what did investigators find? >> well, first of all, they found 367 dogs. over 100 of them just in one single location. they have arrested ten men, seven of them came from the state of alabama. but this goes beyond just fighting dogs and the atrocities involved in that. they're looking at what they seized here in terms of money. they seized a half million dollars in this raid on friday that shows you just what big money is being had at these dogfighting operations. now, they also believe that some of these defendants may have been gambling as much as $200,000 on a single dogfight. again, showing you what kind of money was involved in these operations so doing much further than just dogfighting. they're also looking at illegal gambling operations and what sort of organizations might be out there associated with this. >> that is big money. what will happen to these dogs? >> well, right now, they're in emergency shelter
problems. this hatch -- this happened on sunday engulf port, mississippi. storm hit during a church service. the rain fell so much worshippers became stranded in the church. 6 inches of rain falling in two hours there. the bishop says the property has drainage problems. only time the flooding was worse was during hurricane katrina. whoa. my. likely to be more flooding there today. there will also be heavy rain across the southeast into the mid-atlantic states. clear in the northeast across the midwest and plains. showers in the southwest and rockies. >> 97 degrees in denver. colorado springs. warming up in new york. haven't seen 86 here in weeks. 76, seattle. 90 minneapolis. miami. 109 degrees of dry, pizza oven heat in phoenix. >> the pet population at the white house is increasing by one. the first family has welcomed a second dog. her name is sunny, a portuguese water dog. >> same breed as bo, the obama's first dog. the white house says -- the breed works well for the obamas because of family allergies. sunny is entirely black, bo has a couple white spots down the middle and on paws. as
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 88 (some duplicates have been removed)